Psychology of married women dating men argumentative essay on dating


20-Feb-2020 23:20

Josh, meanwhile, had been dreaming of a cashed-up woman with high ambitions, status, and education, ideally with a Ph D (or two). It was the norm, after all, for men to be the ones to “marry up”.

This scenario probably sounds strange, and it should: I’ve invented an anecdote about how the heterosexual dating scene might look 100 years in the future.

Getting rid of it entirely would require complete gender equality, which doesn’t yet exist.

Regrettably, traditional gender roles persist even in very egalitarian societies.

That didn’t really bother Mia, since Josh’s personality more than made up for it.

Still, he wasn’t her usual “type”—the type that was much younger than her, plus athletic and handsome to boot.

The trend is directly tied to increasing gender equality, as women gain greater access to resources and opportunities in business, politics, and education.

In more gender-unequal nations, such as Turkey, women rate the earning potential of partners as as important compared with women in the most gender-equal nations, such as Finland.

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“Our evolved psychology of mating, after all, plays out in the modern world because it is the only mating psychology we mortals possess.” (There’s little historical or intercultural research on LGBT mate preferences; such questions are clearly important, but sadly there isn’t yet sufficient data to examine them properly.)However, there has been a tectonic shift in gender roles over the past 50 years.If genes determine our mating preferences, how is it that these supposedly hardwired instincts erode in line with societies’ and individual’s gender-egalitarianism?To be fair, evolutionary psychologists acknowledge that cultural factors and local customs can affect how people choose their partners.But gender equality isn’t considered to be one of these factors, since even in relatively gender-equal societies, the gap between men and women’s preferences is only reduced, not eliminated.

However, the counter-punch is that evidence of a lingering gap actually supports case: the difference is only narrowed to the extent that gender equality is attained.

What if a society actually did achieve perfect gender equality?